Where coaches and athletes go to stay a step ahead of their competition

How NOT to train for football

SHARE
, / 67 2
5 Flares Twitter 1 Facebook 4 Google+ 0 LinkedIn 0 5 Flares ×

Last week it was Indian Runs. (A group of players jog around the track in a single file line and then the last person runs up to the front of the line. Repeat repeatedly until boredom overwhelms everyone.)

This week it was bleachers. (Jog up the bleachers, across to the next row, down the bleachers, across to the next row, up the bleachers…you get the idea.)

As I stood there watching these poor kids attempt to get in shape, for a fleeting moment, I thought I had time warped back to 1933…

Sadly, this is the training equivalent of most HS football programs

Sadly, this is the training equivalent of most HS football programs

Now these kids had the right idea:

They were proactively working out and trying to do what they thought was best to prepare them for a successful season. After all, I know a bunch of those kids and I know they have aspirations of winning a Super Bowl this year.

The problem is that football is not cross country.

Football is fast, explosive and aggressive. How does training at slow paces at low intensities prepare anyone for the demands of American football?

You are correct. It doesn’t.

Some of you might be asking:

“Maybe it was a recovery day and they were just doing those workouts as tempo work.”

If that thought crossed your mind, congratulations. You score a point for asking a good question based on legit understanding of workout planning and energy systems!

But that’s not why they were doing it. They were just doing it because that’s what the class before them did, which is what the class before them did, which is what the class before them did…

I call it ‘Groundhog’s Day’ training.

Now, I’m not saying that my beliefs on training are the only viable beliefs on training. I understand that all truths are half truths. And my truths are not the exception to that rule.

But, my friend, we have to keep asking ourselves if our training methods are developing the qualities required in our sport. Because, if they’re not, we’re not going to get the results we’re looking for. And, in that case, why bother?

For football players, training slow will not make your athletes fast, explosive and powerful.

It will, however, make the other team look that much faster, more explosive and more powerful.

So perhaps I’m looking at it from the wrong point of view…

If you want to develop better football players, you might as well take your lead from an expert on the topic.

NFL Head Strength & Conditioning Coach Duane Carlisle’s Total Football Training System is on sale through July 31. Get your hands on a copy now and save $100. You can even break the cost into 3 easy installments.

I’ve had a lot of conversations with Coach Carlisle. Every time I get off the phone, I’ve learned something new.

If your mind is ready for the possibility that some new training ideas will help your athletes and/or your program, then I highly recommend investing in the program while it’s still on sale.

Don’t talk yourself out of making a decision just because the season is about to start. Duane Carlisle’s Total Football Training System is the real deal.

 

Last updated by at .

Athletes' Acceleration
Get your (free) 'Developing the Total Athlete' Video Coaching Series Here
Athletes' Acceleration

Latest posts by Athletes' Acceleration (see all)

Have Something to Add?

Loading Facebook Comments ...
Loading Disqus Comments ...
5 Flares Twitter 1 Facebook 4 Google+ 0 LinkedIn 0 5 Flares ×

PASSWORD RESET

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.


LOG IN